On-Campus Opportunities for Students

Changemakers

Be a Changemaker! changemaker button

 

 

More information on Changemakers:

changemakersmu@gmail.com

 

Changemakers was founded in Fall, 2010 to expand the reach of social innovation and social entrepreneurship across the student body of Marquette. Changemakers emphasizes the problem-solving and systems-thinking approach to tackling the world's most pressing problems, ideas which align with core Jesuit values. In addition to coordinating the annual Social Innovation Design Contest and working with other student organizations to engage the greater community as appropriate, Changemakers members partner with faculty to promote social innovation as a tool for engaged learning and a framework for life.

Changemakers includes students from all colleges across the university, illustrating the inclusive nature and interdisciplinary relevance of social innovation. Everyone can be a changemaker, fostering positive social change in keeping with Marquette's Catholic, Jesuit mission and identity.

Changemaker student group meetings:
Students from all colleges and disciplines are invited to share social innovation ideas, discuss local social enterprise models, and convene as changemakers in Milwaukee.

For 2014 Spring Meetings and Events please check the calendar, or sign up to receive email notificiations from changemakersmu@gmail.com.

Social Innovation Design Contest for Marquette Students! Winner received stipend toward the 2014 AshokaU Exchange hosted by Brown University in February. Information on previous year contest and winners HERE.

Impact Job Opportunities

Social Entrepreneurship Courses at Marquettebhk

Changemakers: Marquette's Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship Student Organization

Executive Board Members:
Andrew Terenzio, President

Email Andrew

Karla Moreno, Vice President

Email Karla

Ryan Twaddle, Events/Publicity Coordinator

Email Ryan

Max Bertellotti, Membership Coordinator,

Email Max

Maggie Stang, Treasury

Email Maggie

Allison Dikanovic, Community Engagement

Email Allison

For more information on Changemakers, please contact changemakersmu@gmail.com.

Emeriti Changemakers Executive Board Members:

2013 Fall Semester

Sara Bres, Community Engagement

Ali Wenman, Treasury

2012-2013

Tyler Atkinson, President

Laura Malandra, Vice President

Michael Thelen, Treasurer

2011-2012

Matt Barr, President

Allison Glaubke, Vice President

Annie Richmond, Treasurer

Steve Powers, Secretary

Elise Chapman, Events/Publicity Coordinator

 

Social Entrepreneurship Job Opportunities

Echoing Green - Social Impact Job listing

Net Impact - Job Board

Benefit Corporation - Job Board

Catholic Relief Services - Campus Ambassador Program

Next Billion

Rework

esc: escape the city

Socialedge

ANDE Careers

Socialgoodjobs.org

Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN)

GreenBiz

Social Entrepreneurship Courses at Marquette

Student feedback here.

ADPR 3200, Marketing Communication Design & Production,

Instructor: Linda E. Menck

This is an applied course that teaches the fundamentals of design including print, web, mobile,and digital publishing, beneficial for students interested in learning basic communication design skills. For those with a social innovation venture, this course will teach them to design business plan materials including website design. Click HERE for more information.

ADPR 4953|5953, Mobile Communication, Instructor: Linda E. Menck

With mobile communication becoming increasingly important in digital marketing strategies, including those in social entrepreneurship, it is more important than ever to understand how the current trends are shaping the mobile environment. This hands-on, experiential lab course will explore trends of mobile communication and marketing strategies. Students will also design and build mobile apps. Click HERE for more information.

ANTH 3986, Internship in Anthropology, Instructor: Deborah Crane 

Students in this course spend 140 hours at an internship placement in the community, and participate in a seminar course that meets once a week.  Many, but not all, of these community internship placements would fit the Social Innovation model.

ANTH 4986, Advanced Internship in Anthropology, Instructor: Deborah Crane 

Students in this course spend 140 hours at an internship placement in the community, and participate in a seminar course that meets once a week.  Many, but not all, of these community internship placements would fit the Social Innovation model.  This course is a continuation of ANTH 3986.

BIEN 4920, Principles of Design, Instructor: Alex Stewart 

Students in this course form teams and work on design projects. In addition to other design targets, project teams can select to work on appropriate technologies to improve healthcare in resource poor nations, such as projects to support Engineering World Health, or the design and construction of a human powered nebulizer. Teams often consist of mechanical, electrical, computer, and biomedical engineering students.

BIEN 4998, Senior Design Project, Instructor: Alex Stewart, J. Goldberg 

Students in this course form teams and work on design projects. In addition to other design targets, project teams can select to work on appropriate technologies to improve healthcare in resource poor nations, such as projects to support Engineering World Health, or the design and construction of a human powered nebulizer. Teams often consist of mechanical, electrical, computer, and biomedical engineering students.

COMM 6997-701, Capstone in Digital Storytelling, Instructor: Carole Burns

Digital Storytelling can take many forms from the most informal personal story to documentary style production. Working on a chosen topic, of which social entrepreneurship is an option, students will develop five different stories using the following six story styles: mobile, short topic, silent, interview, personal, and documentary. Click HERE for a full syllabus.

CRLS 3050, Methods of Criminological Research, Instructor: Heather Hlavka 

This course utilizes a court monitoring project termed mLearn (Marquette Legal Education and Research Network). Mlearn project fits well with social innovation. We are assessing and monitoring the courts to provide solutions to problems that are effective and just for victims of domestic and sexual violence. We address these issues as a social problem rather than individual problems, and solutions have far-reaching social benefits.

CRLS 3660, Sex Offenses and Offenders, Instructor: Heather Hlavk

This course addresses the problem of sexual violence in multiple settings and possible solutions to violence (including, but largely outside of, incarceration). The course material addresses the root causes of sexual violence and victimization that addresses transformation, primary prevention and intervention that benefits society rather than only individuals in individual cases. Discussion focuses on the benefits of a just society, changes and innovations that are sustainable and helpful long-term, rather than short term solutions.

CRLS 3986, Internship and Seminar in Criminology and Law Studies, Instructor: Deborah Crane 

Students in this course spend 140 hours atan internship placement in the community, and participate in a seminar course that meets once a week.  Many, but not all,of these community internship placements would fit the Social Innovation model.

CRLS 4986, Advanced Internship and Seminar in Criminology and Law Studies Instructor: Deborah Crane 

Students in this course spend 140 hours atan internship placement in the community, and participate in a seminar course that meets once a week.  Many, but not all,of these community internship placements would fit the Socia lInnovation model. This course is a continuation of CRLS 3986.

ENTP 3001, Understanding Entrepreneurship, Instructor: Alex Stewart

The focus of this course is on gaining self-understanding and an awareness of the sorts of ventures - and lives - that would be most fulfilling. However, students are exposed to social innovation possibilities in a number of ways, including spiritual readings, class guests, and social innovation ventures of other students.

ENTP 4010, New Venture Creation, Instructor: J. Peterson

This course follows up on ENTP 3001 by coaching further developments in the venture plans first developed in the prior course. An emphasis is placed on incremental additions to knowledge of the market, based on efforts to gain realistic market validation. Whether this course fits with social innovation depends, as it does in ENTP 3001, on whether or not students choose to pursue such ventures.

HEAL 1001, Personal Health and Fitness, Instructor: Robert Topp 

Social components of health and fitness are integrated throughout the course presentations and student assignments that directly address the core content area of individual and social behavior. During the course presentations students are presented with strategies to engage in healthy behavior change based upon a number of theories health behavior change (Transtheoretical model, Theory of Planned Behavior, Health belief Model). Students are then expected to individualize these strategies for health behavior change through collaborating with their Fitness Intern. This social interaction between the student and their Fitness Intern provides the mechanism by which course content is immediately operationalized or applied through the social process of interacting with the Fitness Intern. In addition this individualization of course content challenges the student with the assistance of the Fitness Intern to integrate the health behavior change strategy into their specific social and physical environment while attempting to positively impact their attitudes and perceptions.

HOPR 1953, How to Change the World, Instructor: Jeff Snell

This honors freshmen seminar introduces students to social innovation and social entrepreneurship and its potential to change the world. It will prepare students for their time at Marquette by providing new ways to look at familiar concepts, such as problem management, problem solving, "non-profit" organizations and the ability to develop a hypothesis. The course does not carry a letter grade, so a satisfactory grade is needed to pass. Click HERE for a full syllabus.

MANA 3002, Business and Its Environment, Instructor: Kathleen Rehbein.

This class examines the role business plays in instigating social change. An aspect of that discussion involves examining social entrepreneurship and how it works.

Click HERE for a full syllabus.

MARK 6931, Topics in Marketing: Marketing and Social Entrepreneurship, Instructor: Nicholas J.C. Santos

Social entrepreneurship is a rapidly growing business field which is driven by the twin objectives of social impact and financial viability. This course first introduces students to the field of social entrepreneurship and then focuses on the marketing component. Topics include traditional marketing areas such as the 4P’s, segmentation-targeting-positioning, environmental scanning, value co-creation, branding etc., but viewed from the perspective of social entrepreneurship. As part of the course, students will be expected to develop a marketing plan for a social entrepreneur.

NPSE 6931 801, Topics In Non-Profit Sector: Fundraising & Social Innovation Instructor: Jeff Snell

This summer course is designed for graduate students interested in, or involved with, the American non-profit sector. Upon completing the course, students will be able to design and implement a basic fundraising plan in the contexts of conventional non-profit and social-enterprise operations. Special emphasis will be placed on solving social problems rather than problem management. Click HERE for a full syllabus.

PSYC 4956, Advanced Undergraduate Research, Instructor: Mary Anne Siderits

This course provides opportunities for research and interviewing related to social entrepreneurship, available to psychology majors. We are looking for new members on our "team" for the summer and fall 2013 semesters.

PSYC 4960, Advanced Undergraduate Seminar, Instructor: Mary Anne Siderits

This course, focused on readings and discussion provides a high level overview of psychology with an emphasis on relating spiritual values to social innovation.

SOCI 3550, Race, Gender, Medicine, Instructor: Angelique Harris 

This course examines health inequalities within minority communities.  This course requires a paper that examines the causes of a health inequality facing one particular racial, ethnic, cultural, sexual minority, immigrant, or religious group in the Milwaukee area.  Students will also explore what has previously been done to address this issue.  Additionally, students are required to propose a socially innovative solution to addressing this problem.  This solution must address the root cause of the health issue within this population, must be “doable,” and self-sustaining.

SOCI 3986, Internship and Seminar in Sociology, Instructor: Deborah Crane 

Students in this course spend 140 hours atan internship placement in the community, and participate in a seminar course that meets once a week.  Many, but not all,of these community internship placements would fit the SocialInnovation model.

SOCI 4986, Advanced Internship and Seminar in Sociology

Instructor: Deborah Crane

Students in this course spend 140 hours atan internship placement in the community, and participate in a seminar course that meets once a week.  Many, but not all,of these community internship placements would fit the SocialInnovation model. This course is a continuation of SOCI 3986.

SOWJ 1001, Introduction to Social Welfare and Justice,

Instructor: Louise Cainkar

During the final quarter of this course, Professor McGee Young, Marquette’s Kohler Center for Entrepreneurship Faculty Fellow, informs students about the visions, strategies, and goals that typify social innovation. After that they work in small groups to design social innovations that address the issues of food insecurity, food deserts, and/or child obesity in Milwaukee, followed by presentation to the class. This module on social innovation gives students grounded experience that they can compare to characteristics of the non-profit model they experience through service learning.

SOWJ 2600, Community Organizing, Instructor: Robert Connolly. 

Students are acquainted with several social enterprises connected with Common Ground, such as a Housing Development Corporation to address the foreclosure crisis in the Sherman Park neighborhood of Milwaukee and its own health insurance company - Common Ground Healthcare Cooperative.

SOWJ 3986, Internship in Social Welfare and Justice, Instructor: Deborah Crane 

Students in this course spend 140 hours atan internship placement in the community, and participate in a seminar course that meets once a week.  Many, but not all,of these community internship placements would fit the SocialInnovation model.

SOWJ 4986, Advanced Internship in Social Welfare and Justice, Instructor: Deborah Crane 

Students in this course spend 140 hours at an internship placement in the community, and participate in a seminar course that meets once a week.  Many, but not all,of these community internship placements would fit the SocialInnovation model. This course is a continuation of SOWJ 3986.

 

Are you a professor of social innovation courses and would them featured here?

Contact elise.chapman@marquette.edu

"Social innovation is the future of our generation and the (social innovation) class helped us develop problem-solving skills." - excerpt student course evaluation

Marquette as Changemaker Campus

“Ultimately, we must understand the
need to be agents of change.”       

Pedro Arrupe, S.J.


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