I. COMMUNITY EXPECTATIONS

This statement, authorized for use effective August 16, 2004, replaces the Ethos Statement: Principles of Student Conduct of 1994 and the Statement of Responsibilities and Standards of Conduct adopted in 1985 and revised in 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993 and 2011.

A. Ethos Statement

Marquette University is dedicated to the following goals:

The fostering of personal and professional excellence;

The promotion of a life of faith;

The formation of ethical and informed leaders;

The development of men and women dedicated to the service of others.

These goals can only be achieved in a campus environment in which people feel safe, sustained, engaged, challenged and appreciated. This environment is created by the active contributions of every member of the Marquette community and in turn creates a campus ethos that calls us to act with integrity and compassion; to promote a culture of learning, appreciation and understanding; to take responsibility to confront difficult issues and solve problems; and to behave in ways that reflect care, respect and honesty.

Faculty, administrators, staff and students all have responsibility to take care of the intellectual, social, spiritual, emotional, psychological and physical condition of this community we share. Students particularly contribute to our community through the human connections they make, through the gifts and talents they have, and through behavior that shows:

  1. Respect for Self
    The university values all of its students and is deeply concerned with their total development. Therefore, it is appropriate for the university to set expectations for personal integrity with the aim of encouraging students to appreciate their own talents, take themselves and their academic pursuits seriously, and enhance the quality of their lives. The university will routinely respond to a student engaging in self-destructive behaviors that might impede an individual’s ability to enjoy the privileges of education and to fulfill his/ her obligations as an educated leader. Students engaging in such behaviors are also encouraged to seek help from the university community.

  2. Respect for Others
    One value of learning lies in understanding what knowledge can contribute to the community. It is expected that students will be open to learning, including learning about and respecting persons and cultures different from their own. Members of the campus community must act out of Christian charity and mutual respect to establish an atmosphere of trust, without which there is no community.

    Therefore, Marquette expects its members to behave toward one another with sensitivity, consideration, understanding, tolerance and an active concern for the welfare of others. The university is particularly concerned that its members show respect for others regardless of race, creed, gender, disability, sexual orientation or nationality and avoid all forms of harassing or offensive behaviors. This is especially important in the residence halls and other group living situations, where the sense of community is only as strong as the members make it.

  3. Respect for Property
    The mission we share depends upon the responsible use of all property, including such tangible goods as buildings, library books, equipment and green spaces. Respect for property also involves helping to foster a well-maintained environment: a sense of security, tranquility and accomplishment. This principle requires students to respect personal and institutional property, inside and outside the Marquette community.

  4. Respect for Authority
    Authority derives its legitimacy from its commitment to act on behalf of the common good. At Marquette, that authority especially resides in the officers of the university, its faculty, staff and designated student staff members and paraprofessionals — each of whom has been charged with responsibilities essential to the orderly operation of the university. These people serve as leaders, and they teach by their example what the university expects from all its members. In this respect they help to define the atmosphere that supports and fosters our common mission. Additionally, these people provide structure to preserve the well-being and freedom of community members and an orderly environment in which all can develop. The successful exercise of authority depends in part on the respect it enjoys from the community it serves.

  5. Honesty
    Marquette’s educational mission reflects a commitment to the development of the whole person. As a university, love of the truth is at the center of our enterprise: This ideal is lived out through the virtues of truthfulness, honesty and personal honor. While at Marquette University, students are expected to demonstrate the personal characteristics of honesty and integrity in all aspects of their campus life, both inside and outside the classroom.

    These qualities, which are congruent with our community values and aspirations, are integral parts of daily life on campus. To assure their place in the campus ethos, these qualities are demonstrated, supported and celebrated through our examples, actions and reflections on our experiences.

    These qualities, which are congruent with our community values and aspirations, are integral parts of daily life on campus. To assure their place in the campus ethos, these qualities are demonstrated, supported and celebrated through our examples, actions and reflections on our experiences.

B. Standards of Conduct

When students choose to accept admission to Marquette University, they accept the rights and responsibilities of membership in the university’s academic and social community. As members of the university community, students are expected to uphold its values by maintaining a high standard of conduct. Because the university establishes high standards for membership, its standards of conduct are equally high and may exceed federal, state or local requirements. When student behavior departs from the community expectations, members of the community, including students, are expected to challenge and confront these inappropriate behaviors. When that behavior becomes unacceptable, e.g., when it hurts others, detracts from the sense of community or is irresponsible, it will be addressed by peers or administrators who follow the procedures outlined in the student conduct code below.

The student conduct code as set forth below is applicable to all Marquette students, including, but not limited to, undergraduate, graduate or professional. Within the university, entities (such as academic programs, intercollegiate athletics, and professional and student organizations) have developed policies that outline standards of conduct governing their constituents and may provide procedures for responding to violations of those standards. A student may be subject to those policies and procedures as well as subject to those set forth in the university standards of conduct. In the case of graduate or professional students, if there is a conflict between two applicable regulations and procedures, the graduate/professional school regulation/procedure will govern. If there are multiple components to a case, the components of the case may be separated and reviewed independently by the appropriate authority (e.g. Graduate School, Office of Student Development).

The standards of conduct are intended to incorporate other specific university policies by reference. These policies include the Information Technology Services’ policy on acceptable use of University computer, network, telephone and other electronic resources. The educational mission reflects a commitment to the development of the whole person. As a university, love of the truth is at the center of our enterprise: This ideal is lived out through the virtues of truthfulness, honesty and personal honor. While at Marquette University, students are expected to demonstrate the personal characteristics of honesty and integrity in all aspects of their campus life, both inside and outside the classroom.

These qualities, which are congruent with our community values and aspirations, are integral parts of daily life on campus. To assure their place in the campus ethos, these qualities are demonstrated, supported and celebrated through our examples, actions and reflections on our experiences.

The student conduct procedures will be used to address violations of these policies only if the violation warrants a process or sanction beyond what is available in these policies. In such cases, appropriate personnel may take initial action(s) regarding a complaint as defined by an individual policy; however, final resolution may occur under the student conduct procedures.

The following acts may subject students to disciplinary action:

  1. Violating the university alcohol policy. This includes, but is not limited to, such behaviors as underage students possessing or using alcoholic beverages or any student being intoxicated on or off campus. It should be understood that the effects of alcohol do not relieve individuals of their responsibility to themselves or the community. (See Alcohol Policy for detailed and minimum sanctions.)
  2. Violating the university drug policy. This includes but is not limited to such behaviors as possessing, using, distributing and/or selling narcotics, drug paraphernalia, other drugs or any controlled substance illegally. (See Drug Policy for detailed and minimum sanctions.)
  3. Engaging in behaviors that put an individual in danger.
  4. Physically or verbally abusing or threatening any person, on or off the campus, including especially such persons as student staff and Public Safety officers.
  5. Interfering with safety and health of a member of the university community, on or off campus.
  6. Issuing bomb threats.
  7. Misusing or interfering with fire equipment, including smoke detectors, fire alarms, extinguishers, hoses, etc. or failing to follow fire drill or other emergency procedures.
  8. Possessing, using or selling firearms, other weapons (such as pellet, paintball and BB guns) or incendiary or explosive devices including fireworks on university property.
  9. Participating in stalking, hazing or harassment, which includes actions or situations that do or could result in mental, emotional or physical discomfort, embarrassment, ridicule or endangerment whether intentionally, for fun or by consent.
  10. Engaging in harassment based on age, culture, faith, ethnicity, race, gender, sexual orientation, language, disability or social class.
  11. Engaging in behaviors that are disruptive to the educational community, in or out of the classroom.
  12. Engaging in sexual misconduct, defined as any form of sexual contact with another person without the consent of that person, coercion, intimidation, exploitation or harassment.
  13. Vandalizing property or abusing persons on other campuses or off campus.
  14. Engaging in indecent exposure or engaging the services of another person for this purpose.
  15. Actions of one’s guest(s) that violate university policies. It is the responsibility of each student to inform his/her guest(s) of university policies and community expectations for behavior. Marquette student hosts may be held responsible for the actions of their guests.
  16. Engaging in the unauthorized entry into, use of or occupancy of university premises, facilities or properties.
  17. Engaging in the theft of, misuse of, damage to or destruction of institutional, group or private property, including library materials, computers or computerized information on university-owned or operated premises, at university-sponsored events or off campus.
  18. Engaging in arson or the irresponsible use of fire.
  19. Engaging in Disordering Conduct: Intentionally interfering with any normal function of a university-sponsored activity on or off the campus. (See also the university demonstration policy.)
  20. Violating published policies and rules governing residence halls, student organizations or the university.
  21. Engaging in illegal gambling.
  22. Failing to comply with the directions of a university employee acting in the performance of his/her duties or failing to comply with the terms of a disciplinary decision.
  23. Engaging in acts or deeds that violate existing federal, state, county or municipal laws or ordinances.
  24. Refusing to show or surrender a university identification upon request by a university employee acting in the performance of his/her duties.
  25. Engaging in any form of dishonesty, including cheating, plagiarism, fabrications or assisting others in doing so.
  26. Knowingly furnishing false information to the university. Misrepresenting information about oneself or others when providing information to a university official acting in performance of his/her duties.
  27. Engaging in forgery, alteration or the unauthorized use of university records, documents or instruments of identification.
  28. Misusing financial assistance (aid) through fraud and abuse.
  29. Condoning, supporting, facilitating or encouraging another person’s or group’s behavior that violates any standard of conduct. Students are expected to remove themselves from locations where a policy is being violated and are encouraged to report the incident. Failure to leave an area where a regulation is being violated may result in a student being held accountable for a violation of this policy.

The above examples are illustrative rather than exhaustive. In the event that there arises some ambiguity, inconsistency or need for clarification in this statement, such definition, interpretation or clarification shall be decided by the vice president for student affairs.

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Alcohol Initiatives

Alcohol Initiatives

Each student arrives to campus with different experiences with alcohol. Whether you have experience with alcohol or not, or whether you plan to incorporate alcohol into your college experience or not,the Alcohol Initiatives program strives to give you the information you need to make the right decision for you. Visit the Alcohol Initiatives site here.