Faculty

Research Specializations

Dr. Casey Allen Ignition and combustion phenomena, alternative fuels, and advanced engine chemistry
Dr. John Borg, P.E. Shock physics, hydrodynamic stability and turbulence, fluid dynamics and aerodynamics
Dr. Anthony Bowman   Heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, numerical modeling and simulation of thermofluid equipment processes and systems
Dr. Ronald Brown  Applications of systems and controls in distribution and transmission of natural gas and energy forecasting
Dr. Margaret Mathison Positive displacement compressors and HVAC&R equipment
Dr. Hyunjae Park Energy conversion systems, computational fluid dynamics, heat exchange equipment, heat transfer, thermal engineering
Dr. Richard Povinelli, P.E. Time series data mining and algorithms for electrical energy predictive models
Dr. Somesh Roy Turbulent combustion modeling, soot modeling and pollutant modeling from combustion devices, radiative heat transfer, atmospheric soot, computational fluid dynamics, and high performance computing
Dr. Simcha Singer Combustion, gasification and pyrolysis of solid fuels,
multicomponent droplet vaporization

Faculty Features:

Positive Displacement Compressors

Dr. Margaret Mathison worked with a team of senior design students to rebuild a room air conditioner to run with a newly developed, low-GWP refrigerant alternative in a project sponsored by Whirlpool Corporation. Additionally, Mathison is designing and building a load stand to improve the efficiency of the main power-consuming component in any air-conditioning or refrigeration cycle: the compressors. The load stand will be capable of supplying liquid-vapor mixtures to the compressor at two intermediate pressures, a design unique to Marquette. Read the full article.

Researcher: Dr. Margaret Mathison

The Knuckleball Mystery

Dr. John Borg, associate professor of Mechanical Engineering, and Mike Morrissey, Grad '09, studied the aerodynamics of baseball's most-puzzling pitch for Morrissey's master's thesis. To throw a knuckleball, pitchers dig in their fingernails behind the seam and throw. The knuckleball travels 20 – 30 mph slower than the average fastball. The reduced speed makes the knuckleball harder to hit. Its unpredictable movement leaves even the best hitters and catchers perplexed. Read the full article.

Researcher: Dr. John Borg