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Marquette University
Career Services Center

Holthusen Hall, First Floor
1324 W. Wisconsin Avenue
P.O. Box 1881
Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881
Phone: (414) 288-7423
Fax: (414) 288-5302
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Research

 

Research Career Fields/Occupations
Research Marquette Majors
Research Employers Online

Research Graduate Programs and Institutions
Research Post-graduate Service Programs



Research Career Fields/Occupations

 

The best way to learn what it is really like in a particular career field is through research. This can be done in two ways: online resources and informational interviewing (talking to people in the field).

For each career field you are exploring be sure to gather at least the following information:

  • Salary range
  • Employment outlook
  • Education requirements
  • General description of career/job
  • Skills needed
  • Work environment/conditions
  • What people in this field like and dislike about their positions

Online Resources

All career research comes from one place: the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Below are some of Career Services favorite online resources, which offer different ways to locate and organization occupational information.

Other Methods



Research Marquette Majors



Research Employers Online

The best way to learn what it is really like in a particular organization is through research. This can be done in two ways: online resources and informational interviewing (talking to people who work in those companies).

For each employer or organization you are exploring be sure to gather the following information:

• History of Organization • Major competitors
• Types of products/services offered • Promotional activities
• Reputation • Current industry trends/issues
• Locations • Mission and vision of the organization
• Size and organizational structure • General description of career/job
• Financial stability • Skills needed
• Philosophy • Work environment/conditions
• Prospects for growth or change • What people in this field like and dislike about their organizations

 

 

 

 

 


Online Resources

The best resource is each organization's website. Below are some of our favorite additional online resources, which offer different ways to locate company information



Research Graduate Programs and Institutions

The first step in pursuing an advanced degree is making certain that graduate or professional school is for you. Begin by asking yourself if a graduate degree is required in order for you to meet your career goals. Be sure that your answer is yes before taking on more education loans.

Just as you prepared a list of your satisfying occupational characteristics for making a career decision, you can also use this method of determining criteria for graduate programs.

Career Services suggest applying to nine institutions (programs)

    1. Three "safe" schools: a program that you will almost certainly get into because your test scores, GPA, and grades are well above average when you look at the program's profile.
    2. Three "reach" schools: a program that you have a chance of getting into, but your test scores, GPA, and grades are a bit on the low side when you look at the program's profile.
    3. Three "match" schools: a program that you are pretty likely to get into because your test scores, GPA, and grades fall right into the middle range when you look at the program's profile.

How to find information

  • Attend area graduate and professional school fairs.
  • Visit institutions — while on campus, talk with faculty, students, and admissions staff.
  • Conduct informational interviews with people in your field.

Online Resources

  • Peterson's Guide
    Search for graduate and professional programs by academic level or keyword.

  • US News Education

  • Gradschools.com
    On-line database of graduate programs and descriptions by field of study.

  • Princeton Review
    Through The Princeton Review, students receive smart, effective, efficient test preparation, admissions help, and financial advice.

  • The Student Doctor Network
    Rating of medical schools through surveys of candidates who completed interviews there. Offers valuable insight about the interview day, questions, campus etc. (Medicine, Dentistry, Optometry, Podiatry, Pharmacy, Psychology, Veterinary)

  • Graduate Guide
    A comprehensive graduate college resource with multiple search features and resources for prospective graduate students seeking to attend college.

  • Grad Source: the Magazine for Graduate Studies
    Provides students with a searchable database of grad schools and programs, useful links and resources, a resume builder, career profiles and articles not published in the magazine.

  • College Source
    Features over 9,000 college catalogs representing 4-year, graduate, and professional schools.

  • MyRoad.com
    The most comprehensive resource for education and career decision making. Determine your personality type, explore college majors, colleges, and careers.

  • APA Education Directorate
    Provides information for teachers and students of psychology on accreditation, continuing professional education, scholarships, grants, and funding. Links to resources for faculty and administrators about K-12 teaching and education for all levels.

  • Chronicle of Higher Education
    The Chronicle of Higher Education is the number one news and job-information source for college and university faculty members, administrators, and students.

  • CollegeNet
    CollegeNET is the complete online guide to colleges, universities, graduate programs and financial aid. With CollegeNET you can find the perfect college for you with the college search engine, apply to that college online, then get the funds to pay for college using the scholarship search service and directory. In addition, we provide many links to useful resources and advice to prospective students.

  • Visit institutional and program websites.



Research Post-graduate Service Programs

Committing to a one- or two-year post-grad service program is a big step. Your time spent as a volunteer will have a big impact upon you and others. Here are some questions to help you reflect upon the decision to volunteer.

The first set of questions will help you reflect on your motivations and expectations. The second set is questions you should ask prospective programs.

Questions to Ask Yourself

  • Why do I want to be a volunteer? Everybody decides to volunteer for different reasons. Are you idealistic? Do you want to deepen your relationship with God? Are you committed to social justice? Do you anticipate personal growth? Do you want to change your life?
  • What are my expectations? What do you want to experience during your time as a volunteer? What do you hope to gain? What do you expect from your program and specific placement?
  • What do I have to offer? What gifts can you share with others? What are your strengths/weaknesses? What professional skills do you bring?
  • How do I handle changes? A volunteer year involves a lot of change. Not only will you be living in a new place with new people, you also won’t be earning a salary. How do you handle change? Have you ever been far from your family and support system? How will you adjust to living simply?
  • How do I relate with others? Many volunteers find living in community to be the most difficult part of their volunteer year. How do you interact with others? How do you deal with problems and disagreements? Do you have a sense of humor?
  • What gives me satisfaction? At the end of the day, what makes you feel good? What do you find comfort in? What do you like to do with others? How do you spend your time when you’re alone?

Online Resources