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Marquette University College of Arts & Sciences

Inquiry: Spring 2011 e-newsletter

HELEN WAY KLINGLER COLLEGE
OF ARTS & SCIENCES

Message from the dean

Rev. Philip Rossi, S.J.Welcome to the first issue of Inquiry, the e-newsletter of the Klingler College of Arts and Sciences, which highlights the activities and accomplishments of our students, faculty and graduates. For me, these stories help confirm a conviction I have held for more than 35 years as a faculty member in the Theology Department: The variety and complexity of the College of Arts and Sciences is among its central strengths. The college is a place where the extraordinarily rich world of human experience can be examined, and each discipline — from chemistry to sociology and math to theology — can respond to the questions of “what,” “how” and “why” from its particular perspective. Our faculty and students use these perspectives to help frame the challenging questions we face in interactive, imaginative, international and interdisciplinary ways. I hope this newsletter offers a glimpse of the enthusiasm and determination with which the college pursues such inquiry.

Rev. Philip Rossi, S.J.
Interim Dean
Klingler College of Arts and Sciences
Marquette University
philip.rossi@marquette.edu

Research highlights from around the college and university

It's impossible to share all the incredible work and research being done in the college. A select group of arts and sciences professors are profiled in Discover, an annual publication highlighting research projects throughout the university. The latest issue includes articles about Marquette's first supercomputer, a political scientist working to limit the use of tobacco in Africa, a psychologist studying the impact of family conflict on childhood development and a computer scientist trying to provide medical care using mobile phones, among others.

The science of sledding

When you live in Wisconsin, you learn to make the most of winter. Dr. Chris Stockdale, associate professor of physics, hits the hills to explain the science of sledding — and endures a barrage of snowballs along the way. Stockdale is part of an international collaboration that monitors X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared and radio emissions from extragalactic supernovae, leading the American group of the collaboration. His work is funded by NASA.

Help us celebrate Alumni Awards

The Klingler College of Arts and Sciences will celebrate this year's Alumni National Award winners with a reception and lunch on Thursday, April 28. This year's honorees are Dr. Nancy R. Noeske, Arts '59; Dr. Henry K.H. Kwan, Arts '71; Gilbert D. Sedor, Arts '59; and William J. Schmitt, Arts '01. Learn more about the winners from arts and sciences and this year's festivities

Foreign language students help Law School research

Two key German court decisions, translated by students in the Workshop in German/English Translation course, are being used in legal research conducted by second-year law student Eric Jansson and his faculty adviser, Julian Kossow, visiting professor of law. The decisions have never been translated before.

Joy of reading spread through English Department book swap

Friends and Alumni of Marquette English, or FAME, donated more than 1,000 books to two Milwaukee agencies that promote literacy and learning. Participants were encouraged to take home half as many books as they came with, with the leftover books donated to CrossTrainers Academy and the Sojourner Family Peace Center.

NASA research receives international attention

Robert Fitts, chair and professor of biological sciences, published a landmark study on muscle wasting in astronauts in The Journal of Physiology. In what was the first cellular analysis of the effect of prolonged spaceflight on human muscle, Fitts found astronauts lost more than 40 percent of their muscle strength, even with regular exercise. Coverage of Fitts' study appeared in more than 200 local, national, international and trade outlets, including: USA Today, BBC World Service Radio and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.  

Biology professors receive university award

Students in the introductory biology course have seen changes in the last three years. In a large lecture-based class of 200-plus students, grades used to be based on only a handful of exams. Now students interact with professors using classroom response systems (clickers), have regular writing assignments and review exams with classmates. These changes, among others, by Drs. Tom Eddinger, Michelle Mynlieff and Martin St. Maurice, faculty members in the Department of Biological Sciences, helped them receive the 2011 Way Klingler Teaching Enhancement Award, which they will use to test if their changes improve students' learning.

Honors Program student is world champion on trampoline

Sonia Shah, an arts and sciences freshman in the Honors Program, took first place at the World-Age Group Competition in Metz, France, on the double mini trampoline. The first-place finish makes Shah the world champion for 17- to 18-year-old girls in the specialty. 

 


IN THIS EDITION

Message from the dean

Research highlights from around the college and university

The science of sledding

Help us celebrate Alumni Awards

Foreign language students help Law School research

Joy of reading spread through English Department book swap

NASA research receives international attention

Biology professors receive university award

Honors Program student is world champion on trampoline

Marquette University
Klingler College of Arts & Sciences
Marquette Hall, 208
P.O. Box 1881
Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881

(414) 288-7059
Arts & Sciences website